The Pinhole Podcast Episode 1 – Introductions

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Welcome to the newest show in the Pdexposures network, the Pinhole Podcast! The big show about small holes. When we say big show, we aren’t lying – there are five of us co-hosting. Individually we are Alex, Herschel, Shelly, Jana and Jeff. Join us once a month as we discuss all things pinhole photography.

To kick off our inaugural episode we briefly introduce ourselves, give our background in pinhole photography, and perhaps more importantly declare our stance on notebooks. We’re not shy about our opinions of notebooks, for or against, and we’re certainly not afraid to voice said opinions during the podcast. If you have a strong opinion either way, voice it. We’d love to hear about it.

Beyond introductions we spent much of the episode giving a brief overview of what pinhole photography is, and the various cameras available to purchase. Along the way you’ll hear us mention several pinhole camera makers and models including the Diana F+, Holga WPC, ONDU, and Zero Image.

There are of course a few tangents – what would a podcast be without them? You’ll be treated to a well-timed yet dated ‘that’s what she said’ reference, a few mentions of Pinhole Podcast being a Leica-free zone, and of course a totally random mention of 1960s porn. Trust me, it all makes sense after you listen…we hope.

We’d love to hear from ya’ll, whether you’re a seasoned pinhole photographer or new to the whole idea of lensless photography. You can send your comments, questions, and personal stance on notebooks to us via @PinholePodcast on Twitter , or The Pinhole Podcast page on Facebook.

Thanks for sharing your first pinhole photo (above) for our debut Herschel!

Comments

  1. says

    whoo! new show. this is gonna be a good listen :)

    oh, and considering rangefinders.. they make for good wide angle pinhole mods 😉
    I recommend a cap from an agfa film container if you use a kiev. give it a pinhole on the top and have that part against the inside.

    • says

      Andrew, we have submitted to iTunes, but at this point we have to wait out the approval process of apple. Sometimes it can be fast, sometimes it can be painfully slow.

      The wait has begun.

  2. says

    future podcast thingies: pinhole enlargers? I read about someone using one I dunno where though. and apparently there’s some optimum subject distance depending upon pinhole size and format? I never understood that. and filters. do you put them in front or is it better to put them behind the hole?

    looking forward to the coming shows :)

    • says

      thanks for the great feedback jojonas. Always appreciated. Especially the questions, granted I personally don’t feel qualified to answer all of them. Particularly I know nothing about pinhole enlargers.

      You question about optimum subject distance, do you mean in terms of making an exposure where should your subject be? I’ve not heard there is an optimal distance persay, but wouldn’t surprise me I suppose. One of the selling points of pinhole photography is its infinite depth of field, which would suggest that there is no real optimal distance for a subject to be. Things closer to the pinhole itself will of course be much larger and more elongated than subjects farther away. Hope that answers the question. Let me know if I’m way off the mark on this one in terms of what you where asking.

      As for filters, installing one in the front or inside of the pinhole camera does not matter much. The key is to insure the filter does not interfere with the shutter, and if on the inside it also doesn’t scratch your film. Another thing to consider is dust particles on the filter, those can possibly result in magnified blemishes on your exposures, due to the fact that anything a 1/4 inch away from the film is in focus. So just make sure to check that the filter is blemish free before exposing.

      Hope that helps, and thanks for listening!

      – Jeff

  3. says

    Excellent show ! Can’t wait for future episodes to come out. It peaked my interest enough during this long, cold, snowy Winter to finally take the time and finish the build of my 4×5 pinhole. After much initial success with that one I am now in design, parts acquisition and build mode for a 8×10 and possibly 4×10 pinhole dedicated to shooting X-Ray film.

    Any suggestions for keeping sand off the pinhole itself ? I plan on doing some beach shooting with the 8×10 pinhole this Spring and Summer (mostly New Jersey and Delaware piers and jettys) and having shot 4×5 there in the past I know how sandy the air can be in the wind. Would you recommend a clear UV filter or thin sheet of plate glass in front of the pinhole and do you think that might have an affect on the image quality in any way ? Thanks.

    • says

      Hi, Gregg. Thanks for listening to the first episode. glad to hear you enjoyed it. We are always excited to hear about peoples plans to build their own pinhole cameras. to me that is one of the great things about pinhole photography, the DIY aspects. Granted, I myself have yet to build one (someday though).

      As for keeping sand of a pinhole, there seems to some differing opinions among my pinhole podcast comrades. Personally I don’t worry a bit about sand at all with any of my lensless cameras, or water even. Perhaps I’m naive though as Jana, had her Ondu take a swim in the Pacific Ocean and it rusted it badly to a point that it doesn’t operate well anymore.

      But, if you want to protect your pinhole and the brass/metal area around it, a UV filter would probably do the trick. Installing one in the front or inside of the pinhole camera does not matter much. The key is to insure the filter does not interfere with the shutter, and if on the inside it also doesn’t scratch your film. Another thing to consider is dust particles on the filter, those can possibly result in magnified blemishes on your exposures, due to the fact that anything a 1/4 inch away from the film is in focus. This could end up being an issue if your on a particularly windy beach and sand is flying about.

      Hope this helps, and feel free to share your handmade pinhole cameras on our Facebook page, https://www.facebook.com/ThePinholePodcast.

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